The Value of Paper

I often hear people say that “printing is a dying business.” In fact, I have been hearing this for 20 years, since laser printers and desktop publishing software first began to enjoy mass popularity. Affordable prices and widespread availability of these products led to a wave of in-house design and printing, leading many to believe that printers and graphic designers would soon become a thing of the past. However, most people quickly recognized the difference in product quality when working with professionals, and it also gave many a chance to appreciate the time and effort involved with the work we do every day.

Here is an interesting article about the continuing value of paper as a tool we use every day, and in so many different ways. From scratch pads for making notes to envelopes and folders for organizing materials, paper is an essential ingredient of every business. Calendars & planners help us to plan and organize our schedule, as well as specific projects. And they are also critical for our long-term planning to grow, expand; simply to help us manage the time it takes to run our respective businesses. Sure, electronic tools are part of nearly all of our lives (let’s face it, you are reading this via electronic media!), but paper will continue to be a daily staple for all of us in the years to come.

Paper offers an emotional connection that email and the Internet cannot. That is, there is something about the tactile sensation – the touch and feel – of paper that makes people crave the old-fashioned paper versions of currency, brochures, magazines, catalogs, postcards, etc. over their electronic counterparts. Studies continue to show that while it is more expensive, direct mail significantly outperforms the return rate when compared to email for marketing and advertising campaigns.

– Jeff, Jag Forms President

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Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Print: A Tradition That Lives On | Jag Forms - June 22, 2016

    […] isn’t the first time we’ve heard this. Time and again, the feedback we hear and see — with increasing frequency — is that in an ever-growing […]

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